Tag Archives: developing countries

The ‘better prognosis hypothesis’ for schizophrenia in poor countries. Is it the medication?

Glenn Brady The Schizophrenic, the bipolar and the manic-depressive

Glenn Brady The Schizophrenic, the bipolar and the manic-depressive

Since decades the ‘better prognosis hypothesis’ keeps looming in international research and debates. It’s the assumption, or conclusion, from international research, that outcomes for schizophrenia are better in developing countries compared with developed countries.. Continue reading

The 20 Golden Tips from the GETHealth Summit NYC February 2013

The GETHealth Summit (Global Education and Technology Health), 6-7 February 2013 in the United Nations, New York City, aimed ‘to bridge the health workforce gap in developing countries through new partnerships between innovators in Global Health Education and Information picGEThealthSummit2Technology. The Summit brought together leaders in health, education and IT to discuss and develop initiatives designed to empower providers in the most resource-limited communities in the world’. It were very inspiring and entertaining days: About 150 optimistic and dedicated people from around the World, a bulk of knowledge and experience and plenty of successes and recommendations (and a few failures).

I would like to bring across the main messages from this summit in ’20 golden tips’: Continue reading

Still waiting for the wedding! 10 good reasons for a marriage between Global Mental Health and the New Technologies

Although the developments in the new technologies (or ICT, information and communication technology) are leapfrogging and even difficult to keep up, the implementations of ICT in the global mental health sector seem still crawling. Continue reading

My 10 picks today: 2nd Summit of the Movement for Global Mental Health:

With more then 100 others I attended today, 17 October 2011, this one day summit in Cape Town, South Africa. Although I missed the very first part of the day (due to waiting cue for the registration) and the very last part (due to the desire to do some groceries before shops were closed), I followed all the other 25 presentations and 6 plenary discussions. Continue reading

How to convey the new WHO Mental Health Intervention Guide to workers in the field?

What will be the most easy and most effective way to reach and train health workers in the field about mental health treatments? Now we have the WHO mhGAP Intervention Guide, but how to get this guide implemented in all the corners of the world? Printed on paper? Via the internet? Smartphones? SMS and voice platforms? Here’s an overview of what is possible and seems necessary. Continue reading

332 Mental Health NGOs/user-organizations around the World:

Attention: Due to time constraints, I was forced to stop updating this list by the end of 2016. The information will be outdated soon. Sorry, I hope you will find your information elsewhere on the internet.

Every week in2mentalhealth has been highlighting one mental health NGO/user-organization on the in2mentalhealth Facebook page. All the big/small/nearby/faraway organizations highlighted were listed below in a random order. Each with own challenges and accomplishments. Continue reading

Can eLearning boost the Mental Health capacity in low income countries?

More then 239.000 extra mental health workers are needed in the South and only 54,5% of the low income countries have psychiatric training facilities! How to fill this gap?
In this article possible eLearning applications in 4 mental health capacity areas in low income countries are investigated. With figures, examples and links the current state of art will be presented. A conclusion will be given (‘Yes, it can’) as well as recommendations for the future.
Discussions, comments and additions are very welcome! Continue reading

Time for a wedding! 10 good reasons for a marriage between Global Mental Health and the New Technologies

Most people with mental disorders in low income countries receive no treatment at all for their mental illnesses. The new technologies, like the internet and mobile devices, can solve part of this so called treatment gap. In ’10 good reasons’ the benefits of ICT in this global health field are clarified. 1: ICT is booming business, 2: Saving costs, 3: Reaching people, 4: Anticipating on globalization, 5: Raising awareness and fighting stigma, 6: Empowerment and independence, 7: Capacity building, 8: Global knowledge sharing, 9: Bottom up and demand driven, 10: Standardized and easy access of info. Continue reading